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My local MSNBC runs them nightly and I gotta tell ya, these guys are something else. In their new RX ad they highlight stuff like swiveling headlights that were " specially developed by Lexus engineers ". I'm thinking-You ain't kidding. Weren't the Germans offering those way back when ? They also show off the keyless access/start function on the LS430. " A car that can recognize its owner." No doubt another " revolutionary " feature, eh ? Never mind it's part of a $11K package that's gonna push the price of the vehicle up to $70K-plus. Meantime Infiniti dealers sell FX that offers 2/3 of these things for a retail price of less than $45K at $10K discounts :roll: . Why ? 'Cause Infiniti marketing types aren't good for shyte. Have you ever seen an FX TV ad where they would show how truly different this vehicle is from the rest of the SUV crop ? All you see is that stupid sofa/movie in the sticks at night; guy catching up with a gal on the moving train nonsense; I'm just parked on the roof; and the zig-zagging thru downtown kinds.
 

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yeah nissan needs to step up the marketing fer sho. course by the time i get a fx i dun want every1 to have one erytime i see one now i grind my teeth. haha
 

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Citroen were the ones that invented the swiveling headlights in the 70s. A rather pointless and ineffective mechanical system but the first
 

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esemes said:
DCD said:
Citroen were the ones that invented the swiveling headlights in the 70s. A rather pointless and ineffective mechanical system but the first
didnt the Tucker have em before that??
I believe the Tucker had a model with a swiveling 3rd headlight....right in the middle.
 

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I think you might be right...forgot about the Tucker....didn't they make 51 cars or something? Got sut down by the bigger manufacturers? I'm I thinking of the right car here?
 

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DCD said:
I think you might be right...forgot about the Tucker....didn't they make 51 cars or something? Got sut down by the bigger manufacturers? I'm I thinking of the right car here?
SORRY TO HIJACK---

Information about Tucker Automobiles
Preston Tucker, an automotive engineer who helped to design Miller racing cars before World War II, almost realized his ambition of producing a "completely new" passenger automobile after the war. He and his business associates leased a former Dodge aircraft plant in Chicago for this purpose. Fifty-one nearly identical Tucker automobiles, which were designed by Tucker, Alex Tremulis and J. Gordon Lippincott and Company, were built in 1948 before the Tucker Corporation became embroiled in fraud allegations. Shortly thereafter, the company was forced to go out of business.

The Tucker automobile had many advanced, innovative features, from its fastback shape to its swiveling center headlight and independent four-wheel suspension. Enhanced passenger safety was one of the Tucker's principal features. It had a pop-out windshield, padded dashboard, and a place where the front-seat passenger could crouch in the event of a collision.

The Tucker never entered full production, but its design epitomized automotive trends that were new and significant in the immediate postwar years: avant-garde styling, innovative mechanical features, awakening interest in passenger safety, and efforts by small manufacturers to capture a larger share of the new-car market. The Tucker was an exaggeration of these trends and evidence that the desire for change was strong enough to move some fairly radical ideas from the drawing board to the production stage.

The Smithsonian's Tucker Automobile

Tucker #1039 (the 39th of 51 Tucker cars made in 1948) was forfeited in a narcotics arrest in 1992 and was transferred by the U.S. Marshals Service to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in 1993. From 1948 to 1993 it passed through numerous owners and has been restored. It still has the original Franklin modified helicopter engine (6 cylinders, 166 horsepower, rear-mounted). Its top speed is 120 miles per hour, and the odometer reading is 11,721 miles.

Currently, the Smithsonian's Tucker can be seen at the Blackhawk Museum in Danville, California. The Blackhawk Museum is an SI affiliate.
seems appropriate enough, since it is a reply to an above topic-related item.......

:wink:

"a place to crouch in the event of a collision"???..........oh boy!!
 
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