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Heh, saw the commercials for them last night. I'll take mine with a side of large fries, please... oh, and one of those apple pie thingies...what? 2 for a dollar? Well sure! :wink:
 

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Sweet Fx said:
CHICAGO, Illinois (AP) -- Coming soon to a McDonald's near you: Adult Happy Meals, featuring salad, bottled water, pedometer and a little bit of advice: Walk more.
The sad fact is there's nothing intrinsically wrong with Mickey Ds' food- it's the fault of the consumers who either eat too much, or are lazy lardasses. I eat fast food, too- but I also hit the gym 3-4 times a week (which includes 2mi of cardio each trip), and I don't overindulge (leaves more money for premium gas for my FX :).

I guess I can understand McDs trying to capitalize on it, though, but I don't know how good it'll do.
 

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Ever read 'Fast Food Nation'?
 

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It was not cheap, I think it was $4.99.

But I wanted that step thingy. (have not tried yet)

I spend my whole work day walking back and forth and was curious how many steps I walk in 10hrs.

(I cant stand the smell of McD's burgers, makes me nauious)
 

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ujmot said:
Ever read 'Fast Food Nation'?
What's the Reader's Digest summary?
 

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kcrudup said:
ujmot said:
Ever read 'Fast Food Nation'?
What's the Reader's Digest summary?
Too lazy to write a summary.... It's a good book. Definitely opens your eyes about fast food joints. Here's an excerpt from Amazon:

'Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com's Best of 2001
On any given day, one out of four Americans opts for a quick and cheap meal at a fast-food restaurant, without giving either its speed or its thriftiness a second thought. Fast food is so ubiquitous that it now seems as American, and harmless, as apple pie. But the industry's drive for consolidation, homogenization, and speed has radically transformed America's diet, landscape, economy, and workforce, often in insidiously destructive ways. Eric Schlosser, an award-winning journalist, opens his ambitious and ultimately devastating exposé with an introduction to the iconoclasts and high school dropouts, such as Harlan Sanders and the McDonald brothers, who first applied the principles of a factory assembly line to a commercial kitchen. Quickly, however, he moves behind the counter with the overworked and underpaid teenage workers, onto the factory farms where the potatoes and beef are grown, and into the slaughterhouses run by giant meatpacking corporations. Schlosser wants you to know why those French fries taste so good (with a visit to the world's largest flavor company) and "what really lurks between those sesame-seed buns." Eater beware: forget your concerns about cholesterol, there is--literally--feces in your meat.
Schlosser's investigation reaches its frightening peak in the meatpacking plants as he reveals the almost complete lack of federal oversight of a seemingly lawless industry. His searing portrayal of the industry is disturbingly similar to Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, written in 1906: nightmare working conditions, union busting, and unsanitary practices that introduce E. coli and other pathogens into restaurants, public schools, and homes. Almost as disturbing is his description of how the industry "both feeds and feeds off the young," insinuating itself into all aspects of children's lives, even the pages of their school books, while leaving them prone to obesity and disease. Fortunately, Schlosser offers some eminently practical remedies. "Eating in the United States should no longer be a form of high-risk behavior," he writes. Where to begin? Ask yourself, is the true cost of having it "your way" really worth it? --Lesley Reed --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


From Publishers Weekly
In this fascinating sociocultural report, Schlosser digs into the deeper meaning of Burger King, Auggie's, The Chicken Shack, Jack-in-the-Box, Little Caesar's and myriad other examples of fast food in America. Frequently using McDonald's as a template, Schlosser, an Atlantic Monthly correspondent, explains how the development of fast-food restaurants has led to the standardization of American culture, widespread obesity, urban sprawl and more. In a perky, reportorial voice, Adamson tells of the... read more --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.


Book Description
Fast food has hastened the malling of our landscape, widened the chasm between rich and poor, fueled an epidemic of obesity, and propelled American cultural imperialism abroad. That's a lengthy list of charges, but here Eric Schlosser makes them stick with an artful mix of first-rate reportage, wry wit, and careful reasoning.

Schlosser's myth-shattering survey stretches from California's subdivisions where the business was born to the industrial corridor along the New Jersey Turnpike where many fast food's flavors are concocted. Along the way, he unearths a trove of fascinating, unsettling truths -- from the unholy alliance between fast food and Hollywood to the seismic changes the industry has wrought in food production, popular culture, and even real estate. He also uncovers the fast food chains' disturbing efforts to reel in the youngest, most susceptible consumers even while they hone their institutionalized exploitation of teenagers and minorities.'
 

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Sweet Fx said:
It was not cheap, I think it was $4.99.
Value meals in NYC go for $6 and up. I had 2 slices of pizza and a Snapple the other day and it cost me $9.50.... I need to get the **** out of this city.
 

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Value meals in NYC go for $6 and up. I had 2 slices of pizza and a Snapple the other day and it cost me $9.50.... I need to get the **** out of this city.
I would be broke but we premium in the middle of nowhere for a lot stuff.

Taco Bell is a 45min drive there and it is inside a gas station. :?

We have no good pizza places. :(
 

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Sweet Fx said:
Taco Bell is a 45min drive there and it is inside a gas station. :?
<snort>
So, do they give you the option to hook up a hose to your ass and save on the "core charges"? :p
 

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ujmot said:
Along the way, he unearths a trove of fascinating, unsettling truths -- from the unholy alliance between fast food and Hollywood to the seismic changes the industry has wrought in food production, popular culture, and even real estate. He also uncovers the fast food chains' disturbing efforts to reel in the youngest, most susceptible consumers even while they hone their institutionalized exploitation of teenagers and minorities.
Um, there's nothing in there about the food, though. This guy sounds like the Michael Moore of McDonalds. (I also love how giving many kids- and a lot of kids in the 'hood- their first jobs is "exploitation", too :roll: )
 

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There's PLENTY of things about the actual food in the book.

Michael Moore of McD's? lol. Maybe.... but the things he brings up aren't too far fetched. If you take a look at the people working in these places and take a look at what they do - zero skills required (you dont even need to know how to speak english), everything prepackaged and ready to be assembled in an assembly line. Now going back to the actual food - well it's in the company's best interest to keep the costs as low as possible, which includes the ingredients.
 

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Trivia time :)

What 70's movie was that where they process the dead into "crackers" to feed to the living?
 

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"Soylent Green" Charlton Heston, 1973.

"It's people! Don't eat it! Soylent green is people, I tell you!!!"

I'll take my oscar now, please. :wink:


*edit*
****, got beat to the punch again...
 

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One of the things I've always hated about Micky D's is that if you special order anything, it takes them forever to make it. The upside to that was that I knew it was made relatively fresh, and not just sitting there for the last hour. But in the last several years it's become next to impossible place an order correctly (don't even get me started about getting orders right at the drive throughs) because they usually don't understand what you want. I don't mean for this to sound like a racial issue...it's more of an English as a 2nd language problem, but when you're in a business dealing with the public, wouldn't you want them to be able to communicate with the customers? Anyway, MD is completely off my list now unless I can't find another resturant nearby.
 

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I worry a lot more when I see an english speaking, middle aged person working in one of those places...
 

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FromHereToInfiniti said:
One of the things I've always hated about Micky D's is that if you special order anything, it takes them forever to make it. The upside to that was that I knew it was made relatively fresh
Yup- and before I moved to California, and discovered the Greatness that is Jack-In-The-Box (there are no better burgers!), that's how I'd always order from Mickey Ds (plus, I don't like ketchup).

But in the last several years it's become next to impossible place an order correctly because they usually don't understand what you want. I don't mean for this to sound like a racial issue...it's more of an English as a 2nd language problem
Wow- and you're in Virginia- imagine how it is here in Cali, where all the FF workers are Mexican- yeah, it takes a couple of times (and a verification or two) before you know they've gotten it right- in fact, now they display what you've ordered on a screen in front of you (both in line and at the drive-thru) so you can verify that Jose' (hey- I'm just callin' 'em as I see 'em) got your order right.

but when you're in a business dealing with the public, wouldn't you want them to be able to communicate with the customers?
The problem is these kinds of jobs are only being filled by new arrivals. I can't fault 'em for their bad English, but ****, it's annoying sometimes.
 
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